Filled with historic sites, charming neighborhoods, beautiful public parks for scenic strolls, a variety of museums and delicious dining options, Boston is one of those cities I could repeatedly visit and experience it differently each trip.

Boston had been on my travel wishlist for years. At the end of March, I finally made it to Boston for the Women in Travel Summit (WITS). Although I was there for the conference, I planned to make the most of my limited time in Beantown. Was I successful? I think so, yet I barely scratched the surface of all the attractions I’d like to visit, the foods I want to eat, and the experiences I could have in Boston.

Whether you like art, history, food, craft beer, sports or films, you could easily build a Boston trip itinerary around your interests. If you are like me, you probably want to experience everything. While that’s logically not possible in a long weekend trip, you can certainly make a dent in your list of things to do in Boston and get a real feel for the city within a few days.

If you are visiting for the first time, I’ve got five ideas for how to acquaint yourself with Boston.

Take A Tour Of Boston

On a walk through Boston Common during my Bittersweet Boston tour, we passed by the Massachusetts State House.

On a walk through Boston Common during the Bittersweet Boston tour, we passed by the Massachusetts State House. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

When I’m visiting a new destination, my favorite way to get to know the area is by taking a tour. Walking tours are ideal for photo opportunities, while bus tours tend cover a broader area, giving you an idea how the city is laid out. Both are often full of insightful notions and fun facts that only the locals seem to know. Walking tours sometimes require using public transportation, and this is a great opportunity to learn how to navigate the local subway or bus system.

Sightseeing tours are a great option if you are interested in seeing all the city’s sights in a short time frame, and Boston Duck Tours, which traverse the city by land and the Charles River, came highly recommended to me by one of my cab drivers and the Boston local I was seated next to on my flight from Detroit to Boston Logan International Airport. Since the vehicle drives right into the river, I’d say a Duck Tour would be one of the most fun things to do in Boston with kids.

Are you a history buff? A foodie? A literary geek? A film aficionado? Into ghost stories or pub crawls? Then skip the generic sightseeing tour. Opt instead for a tour tailored to your interests. I took two tours during my first couple days in Boston. After the tours, I was confident I could get myself around the city by foot or the T, and I pinpointed the landmarks, neighborhoods and attractions I wanted to explore further on my own.

During a foodie-friendly walking tour of Somerville, Mass., I visited the Taza Chocolate factory. The 45-minute factory tour costs $6, and it includes a hot chocolate sample and samples of the Oaxaca, Mexico-inspired organic dark chocolates. Yum! (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

During a foodie-friendly walking tour of Somerville, Mass., I visited the Taza Chocolate factory. The 45-minute factory tour costs $6, and it includes a hot chocolate sample and tastings of the Oaxaca, Mexico-inspired organic dark chocolates. Yum! (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

My first tour — “Bittersweet Boston” — was offered to WITS 2015 attendees, and was led by a Boston local. With Rese leading us, our group rode the T to the end of the green line and walked with umbrellas in hand through the pouring rain to the Taza Chocolate factory, Bantam Cider and The Independent, a local pub with an excellent selection of craft beers and some deliciously potent cocktails like the Man Moth, a mix of bourbon, Averna, cinnamon, honey and whiskey-barrel-aged bitters. The Man Moth was a big hit with some of the lovely ladies on the tour. Although the Bittersweet Boston tour was a one-time event, you can find a number of other foodie tours in and around Boston.

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The second tour I took was an On Locations Tour to movie and TV locations in Boston. The bus tour took us past settings used in Good Will Hunting, The Departed, Ted, Field of Dreams, Mystic River and The Town among many other movies. I hadn’t even realized how many films took place in Boston!

As part of On Location Tours' Boston TV & Movie Sites Tour, we stopped for a drink at L Street Tavern, the bar where several scenes in "Good Will Hunting" were filmed. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

As part of On Location Tours’ Boston TV & Movie Sites Tour, we stopped for a drink at L Street Tavern, the bar where several scenes in “Good Will Hunting” were filmed. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

Eat At One Of Boston’s Oldest Restaurants

German beer, wurst over sauerkraut on a pretzel bun, red cabbage and German potato salad at Jacob Wirth, the second oldest restaurant in Boston. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

German beer, wurst over sauerkraut on a pretzel bun, red cabbage and German potato salad at Jacob Wirth, the second oldest restaurant in Boston. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

Boston is full of restaurants serving delicious dishes, but none have done that longer than America’s oldest restaurant — Union Oyster House, established in 1826. Jacob Wirth, the second oldest restaurant in Boston, has been serving sausage and beer (except during that silly prohibition era) since 1868.

I ate lunch at Jacob Wirth my last day in Boston, and it was the best decision I made during my visit. Of course, oysters are a New England staple, so many visitors opt to dine at Union Oyster House. If you like traditional German cuisine, without a doubt, you should also stop into Jacob Wirth for a wurst with sauerkraut and potato salad.

Visit A Museum

The impressionists gallery inside the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, exhibits Claude Monet paintings and "Little Fourteen-Year-Old Dancer" sculpture by Edgar Degas. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

The impressionists gallery inside the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, exhibits Claude Monet paintings and this “Little Fourteen-Year-Old Dancer” sculpture by Edgar Degas. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

With more than 40 museums in the Greater Boston area, you are likely to find one that suits your interests.

Visiting Boston with kids?

Kids will have a hands-on experience at the Boston Children’s Museum and the Museum of Science. They can see penguins and Atlantic harbor seals at the New England Aquarium, and then go whale watching on a Boston Harbor cruise. At the Harvard Museum of Natural History, they may see an emu egg hatch.

Interested in history?

Visit the Boston Tea Party Ships and Museum to dump tea into the harbor like the colonists did. Then stop along the Freedom Trail at Paul Revere’s home, where the silversmith left for his infamous “Midnight Ride.” To see more Paul Revere silver and Revolutionary War relics, visit the Americas collection at the Museum of Fine Arts. Skip ahead to the 20th Century to view Oval Office decor and Kennedy family photos at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.

Interested in art?

No matter which era or medium you enjoy, I highly recommend visiting the Museum of Fine Arts. The museum has one of the largest collections in the United States with more than 450,000 works of art. If you enjoy modern art, the Institute of Contemporary Art has a unique permanent collection and rotating exhibits in a stunning waterfront building with floor to ceiling harbor views in Boston’s Seaport District. Art lovers will find even more at the Harvard Art Museums in Cambridge.

Dine In The North End

The North End's streets are lined with Italian restaurants, markets and pastry shops. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

The North End’s streets are lined with Italian restaurants, markets and pastry shops. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

You absolutely must visit the North End while in Boston. Eat some pasta, drink some wine, get a cannoli and thank me later. Walk along Hanover and Salem streets, and you’ll find Italian eatery after Italian eatery. The restaurants all seem to post their menus outside, so you can just stop once one sounds appealing.

My friends, Sheila and Melody of Wherever I May Roam, and I ended up at L’Osteria, where I had a delicious lobster ravioli in creamy vodka sauce. If you are looking for an after-dinner treat, stop by Mike’s Pastry or Modern Pastry for cannoli. In fact, why not do a cannoli taste test by visiting both like my friends at Diapers On A Plane did!

Holy ravioli! This lobster ravioli at L'Osteria was incredibly creamy. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

Holy ravioli! This lobster ravioli at L’Osteria was incredibly creamy and melted in my mouth. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

Take A Scenic Stroll

Take a walk through the idyllic Boston Public Garden, the oldest botanical garden in the United States.

Take a walk through the idyllic Boston Public Garden, the oldest botanical garden in the United States. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

Now that you’ve taken a tour, visited a museum and dined around Boston, you can wander. Boston is wonderful for wandering. It’s a fairly small “big city” at 48 square miles, so a 30-minute walk could take you past Back Bay rowhouses, ritzy Newbury Street shops, and Beacon Hill’s charming brick and cobblestone streets.

Acorn Street has the Federal-style rowhouses, gaslit street lamps, and extremely narrow cobblestone street with brick sidewalks for which Beacon Hill is known. Perhaps that is why it is the most frequently photographed street in America. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

Acorn Street has the Federal-style rowhouses, gaslit street lamps, and extremely narrow cobblestone street with brick sidewalks for which Beacon Hill is known. Perhaps that is why it is the most frequently photographed street in America. (Erin Klema/The Epicurean Traveler)

You could also stroll along the Charles River Esplanade or through Boston Public Garden and Boston Common. If you are walking through Boston Public Garden with children, be sure to find the “Make Way for Ducklings” statue near Charles and Beacon streets and take a ride on a Swan Boat.

Where To Stay In Boston

Revere Hotel room in Boston

While visiting Boston, I stayed at the stylish Revere Hotel in Boston’s Bay Village. This modern boutique hotel is a short walk from Boston’s theatre district, Boston Common, Boston Public Garden, and Jacob Wirth for delicious German cuisine and beer. You can see how other travelers rated the Revere Hotel Boston Common, check room rates for your travel dates, and even book your room on TripAdvisor.



Booking.com

On my last night in Boston, I wanted to experience the city like a local, so I booked a Back Bay apartment through Airbnb. From my rowhouse apartment I walked to Trident Booksellers & Cafe for an afternoon latte and book browsing and then met up for drinks with a friend from high school at Back Bay Social Club. If you want to experience Boston like a local too, you can get $40 off your first Airbnb booking with my invitation link.

More Ideas For Your Boston Trip

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Things to see, do and eat in Boston! If you are visiting Boston for the first time, this list is for you. Get your travel tips today at EpicureanTravelerBlog.com!


Tell me, what are your favorite things to in Boston?

If you haven’t been to Boston yet, what would you like to do there?

Disclosure: As a Women in Travel Summit attendee, I took the On Location Tours’ Boston TV & Movie Sites Tour for free and received a pretty rad swag bag. This post also contains some affiliate partner links. Booking a hotel or purchasing a product from one of these links — at no extra cost to you — helps to support this blog. I only share hotels and products I truly recommend and have or would stay at/use myself. As always, I strive to share accurate information and fair and honest opinions about my experience. I was not otherwise compensated for this post.

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